Saturday, May 2, 2009

Congratulations to selected colleagues

If you read this post, chances are that you have been selected to participate in the Danida Fellowship Course leading up to the COP15 Climate Summit in Copenhagen.


This blog is open for all to read - but we have not submitted the details to google, so you will have to know about its existence in order to find it.

The COP 15 venue Bella Center is quiet these days, but thousands of people are already busy preparing for the Summit - and Danicom and Nordeco are busy working on the last details of the course programme. You will find it on this blog as soon as have all details confirmed.

When you have finished reading this page, please take some time to fill in the questionnaire, which you will find here. That will help the trainers meet your expectations for the course

We are sure that you will enjoy Copenhagen and Denmark in June, which Danes consider the best time of the year with lots of sunshine and out-door life. You can see more about the City on www.visitcopenhagen.com.



The official website of the Summit can be found at www.cop15.dk

Very soon we will send you the log-in to this blog and we look forward to get you contributions prior to the training course.

All the best from the Danicom/Nordeco team.

5 comments:

Per Oesterlund said...

This is where you can post your comment - good luck!

philip said...

Here's a relevant article for the course: http://www.hks.harvard.edu/presspol/publications/papers/discussion_papers/d49_pooley.pdf
Although focused on the political process in the U.S.A. the article is very insightful on the power and importance of good journalism. Written by a former managing editor of Fortune and writer for Time magazine it examines how media has covered an important political battle in the U.S. on the economics of climate change. It describes how policy has taken centre stage now that the scientific basis for climate change is well established. It addresses the challenges journalists face, and defines what makes good journalism.

Philip said...

Here's a relevant article for the course: http://www.hks.harvard.edu/presspol/publications/papers/discussion_papers/d49_pooley.pdf
Although focused on the political process in the U.S.A. this is an insightful article on the power and importance of good journalism. Written by a former managing editor of Fortune and writer for Time magazine it examines how media has covered an important political battle in the U.S. on the economics of climate change. It describes how policy has taken centre stage now that the scientific basis for climate change is so well established. It addresses the challenges journalists face, and defines what makes good journalism.

DFC COP15 Course said...

Message from Ochieng Ogodo:

INTRODUCING THE KENYA ENVIRONMENT AND SCIENCE JOURNALISTS ASSOCIATION [KENSJA]
www.kensja.org

In the age of globalisation exacted upon us by the Information and Communication Technology wizardry, there is much new knowledge pouring from millions of research projects and studies around the world that push the boundaries of man’s knowledge to new heights, almost daily.
As long as science or scholarship remains enshrined in technical language and laden with heavy jargons, it will need science journalists/reporters who can communicate with scientists and help translate the new developments accurately and clearly, especially for the less erudite members of society who need the information most to thrive-or try to-in their day-to-day lives.
Environmental journalism is now interrogating critically the relationship between man and nature.
But it isn’t easy plying science journalism in the developing world. Most news channels have very little space allocations for environment and science stories. Most journalists in this segment are correspondents whose monthly monetary gains are pegged on the number of stories published/aired, and very few successfully ‘compete’ for space.
This has, in fact, forced some to ditch science journalism and take to other areas of the profession enjoying favours with chief gatekeepers of specific media establishments or opt for more sustaining areas outside the profession.
The world over, one the most considered ways of furthering environment and science journalism and overcoming some of the difficulties aforesaid is the coming together of those with passion for it. The World Federation of Science Journalists is a living testimony to this.
It is for this that the coming together of environment and science journalists in Kenya to form the Kenya Environment and Science Journalists Association [KENSJA. URL: www.kensja.org] marked a truly great turning point.
A truly great turning point in the relationships of this lot of hard working professionals who, difficulties notwithstanding, will always strive to bring to the people many fascinating as well as heart rending science stories in Kenya, and beyond; those always in the hunt to inform millions of people on new advances, setbacks and controversies in science for informed choices.
In Kenya today, for a truly science journalists’ association, KENSJA is the home for seasoned and upcoming science reporters and correspondents; it is the convergence point where experience and youthful vigour mixes admirably. If you want an association of environment and science journalists in Kenya , look no further than KENSJA.
Their coming together was the beginning. Keeping together has been progress and staying as one a huge success.
We want to thank the Institute for Law and Environmental Governance [ILEG] that facilitated the construction and deployment of our website under their Greening the Media for Sustainable Development in Kenya project with funding from Danida.
We are also greatfull to the International Development Research Center [IDRC] for sponsoring fifteen of our members to The Third East African Health and Scientific Conference at KICC from March 25-27.
The Kenya Forest Service organized a four-day tour of several forest locations for our members in sections of Central, Eastern and Rift Valley provinces in late May and we thank them greatly for this

Philip said...

Ochieng Ogodo offers this article:
http://www.scidev.net/en/news/livestock-may-do-better-than-crops-african-farmers.html